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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
a number of possibilities for us. how can we use these digital technologies and learn fm them to change education on our alone campus. what weighs will we see based on the experience of these mass courses. how can that transform in cambridge and boston. secondly, we see it as a way to get harvard ideas and harvard teaching out to a broader world and way to accumulate a lot of data that can be an extraordinary resource for anybody who like to use that material to ask questions about the nature of human learning and how it ought to be structured. on the point about spreading learning to the rest of the world, i have a very moving reaction to one bit of data. one of the pilot courses. when i was in india, i met with people in india who were wanting to interact with harvard. there is a need for engagement with our schools public health. we have enormous challenges in that area. i was talking to these individuals about what kind of courses we might involve them in. this online course that i described steele has overall more than 40,000 students and 9000 of them come from india. last january
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
have that in u.s. hands -- i would rather have that in u.s. hands. >> i think george washington summed it up best. keep strong american borders and stay out of other countries squabbles. what ever happened to our christian ethics and foundation? >> the biggest change in american foreign-policy since the republic was founded was the creation of nato in 1947. it was the point in time the united states said they would engage in other countries in our national interest. the previous 165 years of american history avoided those kinds of commitments. you can make your own decisions if it was smart. i think it was wise myself. it was a significant change in the orientation of american international engagements. that has been true since 1947. 65 years we have been engaged that involve the united states and the global leadership position. we want to leave or doing what to stay or do we want to alter? those are the decisions of the obama administration would face. when you do not have the kind of resources that allow you to do everything you want to do in commit to every engagement, what are the
later, we will discuss the recent increase in u.s. manufacturing. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, december 19, 2012. the white house has thrown its support behind several gun- control measures on tuesday in the wake of the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut. a state department inquiry into the september 11 terror attack in benghazi, libya, criticized the agency harshly for inadequate security that -- but specificrecommend signi individuals. and we begin today in on the details of john boehner's plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. we want to hear from you. how optimistic are you that a compromise can still be reached before the end of the year? give us a call -- and you can get up with us on all your social media web sites on facebook and twitter, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. i want to take you to the lead story in today's washington post. that was today's washington post. here's the headlines from "politico" today. i want to take you to speaker john boehner's comments on the state
us from england, and to make us free. human rights day is about advancing equality and the american constitution as it has expanded over the years to include new groups of people and strike down barriers of race and gender, ethnic background, national origin. it is about the progress of human rights and equality, the noblest of causes for this nation and what brings us together in many ways as americans. the fight for freedom. the search for equality. and justice. and i want to talk about three specific ways that we can advance the cause of human rights in this chamber, in this session through measures that are before us. the first concerns human trafficking. i've been particularly interested in the rampant human trafficking problems on american bases abroad in places like iraq and afghanistan. victims are recruited from third countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confisc
, the last one of 2012. a word most of us have never heard of until the last few years is fracking. it's a way of extracting natural gas from shale rock by fracking it. it has many champions and critics too. we've asked david pogue to report our cover story. >> we drill straight down vertically into the shell. once we hit into the shell, then we go horizontally. >> reporter: two miles under our feet there are billions of tons of shale rock loaded with natural gas. and now we have the technology to get it out. but critics argue that it's energy with a very steep price. >> i don't believe that fracking will ever be safe. >> reporter: later on sunday morning, the promise and the perils of fracking. >> osgood: jamie foxx has to be one of the most talented people in american show business. you name it. he does it. byron pitts will get him to show you. >> jamie foxx has made it all the way from the little town of texas to the pinnacle of hollywood. ♪ she knows how to... >> my book will be called "i still pinch myself." >> reporter: he's funny. he can sing. he's an oscar winner. you'll see
of the remarkable people who have left us in the year just pending. >> 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,. ♪ take a load off... >> osgood: they made our hearts sing. they made our spirits soar. >> that's one small step for man. >> osgood: some saved lives, some gave their lives. and all touched our lives in ways great and small. we remember those who left us in 2012. on these cold winter days, what could be nicer than a trip down mexico way. in mo rocca's case make that way down. >> reporter: the beaches of cancun, mexico, are known for girls and guys going wild. it's art in the wild. >> i have a whole little team of helpers underwater that do the finishing work. >> reporter: ahead on sunday morning, art that lives underwater. >> osgood: the fast draw asks why we dress boys in blue and girls in pink. we'll travel to scottland to order up some world class scotch whiskey. we'll be remembering the good and the bad of the year 2012. and more. but first here are the headlines for december 30, the last sunday morning of 2012. senate negotiators in washington are working through the weekend to try to come up w
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
gave himself near absolute power. >>> a former u.s. marine who spent four months in a mexican prison is free today. jon hammer was locked up in august on weapons charges. his family says he was physically abused in custody, threatened, chained to a bed and never saw a judge. u.s. lawmakers and diplomats got involved on ma'am hammer's behalf and convinced mexican authorities to release him. [ bells tolling ] >> america is pausing to remember the newtown shooting victims. church bells rang out friday exactly one week after the tragedy. flags remained at half staff. many websites even went dark. people all over the country observed a moment of silence for the 20 children and 6 educators. today there is a walk for peace in newtown, and three more children will be laid to rest. ana grace marquez-green, who lost to count and sing. josephine grace gay, who celebrated her 7th birthday. and emilie alice parker. lots of backlash for the nra for their statement friday. gabby and i are extremely disappointed by the nra's defiant suppose. they could have chosen to be a voice for the own members w
. >> that is it for us here at "money in motion." your next chance for a trade sunday afternoon. cnbc. have a great weekend. >>> i'm jim cramer, and welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game. >> firms are going to go out of business, and he's nuts! they're nuts! they know nothing! >> i always like to say there's a bull market somewhere and i -- >> "mad money." you can't afford to miss it. >>> hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends. i'm just trying to help you save some money. my job is not just to entertain you but i'm trying to educate and teach you. call me. 1-800-743-cnbc. you want to get a sense of just how important this -- i hate to even say it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the poten
. it used to be a staple of small- business lending. you have a track record, a clear plan, they will make you a loan on your ability to pursue that. that is gone. they are in the same boat. they cannot get the loan. >> i am curious from the small business perspective, i think small businesses are coming up a lot right now as we talk about tax rates and making sure you protect small businesses. do you feel the issue is the most crucial for small businesses, or is it things like financing the -- >> rates are important on the tax front for small companies, i think the most important things are having a long-term sense of the code and try to grapple with tax reform to simplify the code. a center of our own polling, yes, they do not like playing -- paying the tax rates. the bigger thing is the burden of complying with the tax code the half. you have to remember small business people pay taxes at individual rates. they do not populate their income the same way individuals do. they have to deal with the business side to see what their tax code is. they also pay the taxes themselves. like most wo
and fabulous and amazing. pick your favorite color this is brand new u.s. the first audience to see id.it is scheduled tonight but i did not think it will be there so you should get yours now item213-857. i am so excited! we have a lot of fun things coming. we would love to hear from you 1-866-376-8255 >>host: also definitely join us in the live chat we have someone there that will be saying hello to you. we love girls and the live chat. nload that application for free bite diallingtar star hsn.you can also join me on facebook page i am colleen lopez on hsn. i hope you are in the mood for shopping because we have special things in store for you. including the biggest and best value ever on the herkimer quartz is our beautiful earring today's special, hit it comes [♪ music ♪] >>host: look at the gorgeous collette she is dripping and herkimer. if you fell asleep last night, we knew this would be popular but almost 16,000 are out the door. majority of our day supply gone in the midnight showing. if you have been looking for the most gorgeous uniquely beautiful earring (...)this wi
's a -- how many times can you tell us that monster drinks aren't any worse and may actually be better than a cup of joe from starbucks? let us count the ways that this analyst meeting slash lovefest, they will tell you that there's no better way to preserve your heart than to drink a taste of monster every morning. now, analysts will be plenty hopped up when they come out of this meeting because they'll be recommending this stock in high-speed fashion. next on wednesday we're going to get the results from joy global. here's the company that has the best read on chinese growth of all the companies i follow. in fact, joy global called the bottom in the slide over there by analyzing data on chinese electricity use. can't be jiggered. people think this is an original equipment business, but i've got to tell you once again we're going to hear from the straight-shooting ceo michael sutherland that maintenance is more important. maintaining it is the equivalent. i'm going to listen to what he says about india. we don't talk about india enough. they are like coal junkies over there. it's like get
. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in new york city, we have msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. >> in my ear, mika. >> no, he was at the white house. >> i don't understand. where's t.j.? >> he's off today. >> why's that? >> he was busy. he went to the white house. >> that's great. you know, alex went to the white house, too. >> and drove back himself. >> let me get this straight. so alex goes to the white house last night. >> mm-hmm. >> because, you know, right-wing bloggers, we actually -- that's how we get our talking points. they go down -- valerie and david axelrod together make a big pot roast for us. >> mm-hmm. >> and lots of gravy. and we sit around eating it. and i, of course, say okay, give me extra gravy. i'm good with it. >> right. >> best sweet tea i've ever had. >> there's a give and take. >> actually, it was a christmas party. go ahead and do your blog. you sure as hell didn't get mitt romney to like it. they're not attacking me. i wouldn't know. i don't read it. so t.j. goes down. this is big. it's big. alex comes back. >> drove back. >> and he works. >> drove fr
to become competitors that try to crush us. >> a lot of people in this audience know a lot more about this issue than i do, so i want to go to the audience. before i do that, i want the three of you to take out your crystal balls and tell us, the next 12 months, what will happen on this issue? steve? >> i am cautiously optimistic. six months ago, it passed with broad bipartisan support. with they came together on that legislation because it was important to provide sbrures with capital even though they said nothing could get done, something did get done. the good news people recognize the issue is important and there is a general agreement on the solution around high skilled immigration. the problem is is the politics and the economy and jobs have been prumped by the politics of immigration. i think there are four paths. one could be the pass the senate not be taken up in the senate. there is a lottery that would flult raising the overall level of immigration. if there was an agreement to include that that bill could be passed. a second option which is what the president has ind indic
. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that th
22% of energy consumption, one-third more used in passenger trucks and cars combined. this will create thousands of u.s. jobs in the hardest-hit industries on jobs that cannot be of course using materials that are 90% made in the usa energy efficiency is unique in that it creates its own cash flow. it pays for itself. there are significant barriers that prevent this from being harvested more efficiency -- more efficiently. one is to begin -- and this is akin to building power plants. we know how to finance power plants. they supply predictable amounts of energy and utility can easily raise capital. however we lack the same capital for energy efficiency even notice understood to be the most cost-effective resource for meeting our needs. the energy efficiency efforts equate to a resource greater than any other source in the country. greater than nuclear, natural gas or coal. this is a great example policy that can move the -- this provides incentive to home owners to increase -- the greater the incentive, i the savings. transitioning allows for business model metrology
and had no idea who he is. he's now the subject of a critically acclaimed documentary and he joins us to tell his story. >>> and it's not a bird or a plane. it's the latest version of "superman," one of the blockbuster movies due out in the new year. all that and so much and more on "cbs this morning saturday" on this saturday, december 29, 2012. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to the weekend. this is the final weekend of 2013. >> exciting stuff, right? >> exciting to have you here with us. >> glad to be here. >> i said 2013 because i'm preparing for the new year so everybody knows. >> in for anthony mason. >> it's nice to have you with us for our new year's treat. >> thank you very much for having me. >> we also have another new year's treat for all of you this morning. >> yes. one of the world's great chefs david buis here in studio 57. duck with a little lobster and oysters on the side. and, of course there's champagne. >> and i haven't had any of it even though i said 2013. >> some champagne would be nice in one of the cups sniet would be nice.
to the atmosphere. on the other hand, people who are living in a western-style exist then use a lot more energy than people in the developing world. one of the terms in the product of terms from which we deduce future carbon emissions is global population. we tend to believe the global population will stabilize with 10 billion people by the middle of the century because the developing world will take on some of the characteristics of the western world in terms of their rate of production, for example. when you look at some of those projections, built into many of them is the assumption that the global population will eventually stabilize. if it does not do that, it means that the problem is even worse. that is the key uncertainty, the wild card. >> the bottom-line is a really nice where people are in the world, but how many people want a u.s. lifestyle. >> thomas rÜgen talks about an america that has 3 billion people. >> my name is wayne rauf. it is -- wayne rth. what will it take to make the sacrifices to save our planet? my basic metaphor for what we're doing to plan a is putting a stick in a hor
failing us a great deal and i'm so sick and tired of them fighting. >> the equivalent of worried about your mortgage after you're already homeless. so it's, like i said, sad. they have a job to do and they're not doing it. >> reporter: now, with public pressure mounting, the house and senate are expected to be back in session tomorrow, ready for a vote that could impact the economy for better or for worse. kate? >> kristen welker at the white house. nbc's moderator of "meet the press" david gregory joins me now. as we've said, david, you sat down with president obama this afternoon for an exclusive interview that airs tomorrow morning, but give us a hint. is he optimistic? do you come away with any hope that we're going to have a deal before the deadline? >> i'd say a couple things. i think the president continues to be optimistic, but he, i think, in part is doing the interview on "meet the press" because he wants to keep the pressure on republicans to get something done and made very clear in the course of the interview that there is a political cost to be paid if there is not a deal
, senator mcconnell, later today. that shows us kind of where things stand. i wanted to break this down simply because there's so much that complicates the story. let's look really quickly at a graphic of the basics, what's happening right now. here's where we stand with the fiscal cliff. first of all, who's doing the negotiating? ice the top two senators, senator reid for the democrats, senator mcconnell for the republican, and it is their staff who are working out details right now. what are they talking about? mainly trying to find a way to avoid those tax hikes for most americans. that could also include an extension of unemployment benefits. what is unclear is whether other things such as budget cuts eliminating that sequester that's coming up or other things will be in that deal. when will all of this happen? the soon they could vote is tomorrow, but leadership tells us that they are just hoping to get the outlines of a deal to their members tomorrow so a vote also possible monday. that's when senator reid has said he wants the vote to hap n happen. again, just to be clear, we do
advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times head
. for us to move forward in this situation we are in ohio, we need not overreact to stories and we need to seek ways of getting all the participants in the political process to admit that it is easy to follow and that fraud is rare. until we can overcome those misperceptions, i think it will be very hard to get that balance of a swing state like ohio. thank you. [applause] >> with such an esteemed panel, i feel like i should announce my candidacy for indiana secretary of state. [laughter] then i think about all the academic writings i have does it law professor and what the opposition would do with those. i think i will not. i work in indiana and i will talk about indiana and our experience so far with photo identification. indiana is important nationally for a couple of reasons. we were just about first -- is there anybody from georgia in the room? if there isn't, indiana will take credit for being first in line on photo identification. as a requirement. also, india has served as the model -- indiana has served as the model for photo identification laws that have been passed and litiga
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)